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schools of thought on how to deal with israel. mark perry is a foreign policy analyst who remains close contact with the hamas leadership. >> abu mazen has gambled very explicitly and said very explicitly that there will be no violence against israel and he will negotiate in good faith with israel. the problem is that hasn't gotten him anywhere. hamas has a totally different approach and their approach is resistant. they believe israel will only come to the table when they feel pain. >> warner: a bring number of palestinians see justification for that belief. last november a week of palestinian rocket fire from gaza and israeli air strikes led to an egyptian-brokered cease-fire between hamas and israel. as part of that, some israeli restrictions on gaza were eased. the year before, hamas secured the release of a thousand prisoners from israeli jails in return for handing over gilad shalit, the israeli soldier it kidnapped in 2006. >> it has sent a clear message to the palestinian people if you abduct soldiers the they will be released but if you sign agreements about w us about releasin
degree was running its own foreign policy. one of the big things we're looking to understand about ping's government over the next year or two is whether he can bring the pla under his control. he's already been head of the military commission which is really the most powerful role there. it took hu jintao a few years before he got named to that post. >> rose: david sanger thank you as always. >> thank you, charlie. >> we look at politics the republican and democratic party. the republican national committee comes in the way of political conference where republican leaders met to discuss the future of their party. report contained an endorsement of comprehensive immigration reform and extensive discussion of social issues. the gop has struggled to define itself since the loss in the 2012 presidential election. joining me to help me understand this from washington al lent fr boomberg view andark halperin from "time" magazine. i'm pleased to have both of them back on this program. i begin with this al. as you know i've been in rome watching the new pope be selected. so i've been there ge
that was open to conservative views, particularly on foreign policy and some domestic issues. it was much more electric than at this time is now. now it is another liberal magazine. >> i want to show you an ad that was in the publication in 2007. well let's see if you remember this ad. on the screen, all aboard, enjoy seven days and night on the aalso can coast with your favorite weekly standard pundits, june 16-23, 200. special private programs and receptions. on and on. like-mind conservatives. what was the impact of that cruise on american politics? >> sure. well i think the discovery of sarah palin was one thing. on the cruise, we went up there in southern -- we were not up around anchorage in that part of alaska, but we were mr. we went to juno and so on. in juno, we were invited by the governor to have lunch at her house in the governor's mansion. he found out later this came about because the woman who was the head of the alaska federation of republican women or whatever the title is and had told the governor's space that we were coming and, at first, she was ignored. she told them agai
. >> dick cheney was a trained foreign policy expert. so was colin powell. >> indeed, the facts and iraq's behavior show that saddam hussein and his regime are concealing their efforts to produce more weapons of mass destruction. >> the national debate over going to war in iraq was heavily lopsided in favor of war. in the united states senate, the war resolution passed with 77 votes, only 23 senators opposed it, including only one republican rhode island senator rink on chafee. >> what concerns me most is the pattern we see applied to iraq, that is abandoning of our alliances and willing to be preemptive without any real evidence of weapons of mass destruction. >> in the house of representatives the war resolution passed with 296 votes. 133 house members voted against it, including a congresswoman from san francisco who was working her way up the leadership ladder. >> let's do what is proportionate, appropriate, which mitigates risk for our young people, another cost in addition to human lives, cost to terrorism and cost to the economy and another cost to our budget. this cost can be unl
'll come back and talk more about that and what it meant fo american foreign policy going forward. we continue our discussion on this tenth anniversary of the iraqi war with the distinguished panel of people who observed and written about the war sinces beginning. from cambridge, glrngd john burns, the london bureau chief of the "new york times." in new york, michael gordon, chiefch military correspondent r the "new york times." fouad ajami, a senior fellow of the hoomp institution. dexter filkins of the "new yorker" we hope will be joining us shortly. i go back to michael gordon.ly tell me what the judgment of history will be about our participation in the iraqi war. >> i think too much attentionwa has been paid to the decision tc go to war and not enough on the management of the withdrawal from iraq and where we go from here with iraq. because the story of iraq is not over. and we shouldn't just put thisov chapter behind us and say we're done with it. there were opportunities to be engaged with iraq by the u.s. government on the level of common citizens. there's a tbalt for influenc
, and we saw a column earlier today from a senior member of the american foreign policy council and he's suggesting that the u.s. is less popular in the middle east now than it was at the end of president george w. bush's administration. let's debate that, bring in alan colmes, the host of the alan colmes show and ben ferguson, the most of the ben ferguson show. >> hi. >> alisyn: alan, what do you think of that premise. did candidate obama said he would help to elevate our status internationally after what he believed president bush had done and that our stature was no longer as high. do you think president obama has accomplished that? >> i do and i spent time looking at the polls and our standing worldwide and particularly in the muslim world is a little higher than at the end of the bush administration. one of the problems we have is the anti-islamic video that came out about a year ago and hurt us in pakistan and hurt us in many parts of the middle east and we also were hurt in pakistan by doing something which most of us applauded, going in and getting bin laden. so there are certa
to offer as president on foreign policy. one of the things i have to say that richard nixon is he believed in the big play, or you call it a hail mary pass. he was willing to take huge risks. not all presidents are will do that. detente with th the soviet union with 20. so get a lot to offer presidents. but i do believe, i know this for a fact, there was an effort to make it difficult was it takes to become available. richard nixon, richard nixon by the way was totally in his right to assume that the tapes belonged to him. because every president until richard nixon owned their papers. the national archives didn't know that there were kennedy tapes until, until the nixon tape were released and the kennedy family dental the nation archives, you know that safe in the warehouse which we only have teased? there are tapes there. the national archives didn't know. and so president kennedy, president johnson and president nixon assumed that the tapes they were making would belong to them. well, when president nixon cut a deal, with the overseer of the national archives to try to get back to tapes
now by two upstarts. lapid and bennett, both of whom are not focused in the main on foreign policy and security issues but on social and economicnes so it's a paradox, in order to maintain his relevance as a foreign policy national security guy-- which is his strong suit-- the fact is he does need a better relationship with obama because obama holds the key on that front, certainly on iran. >> reporter: speaking of iran-- and i'll come back to that relationship-- is what the president saided in an interview with israeli television, will that comfort israelis? >> it certainly should comfort israelis. after all, the record suggests that the administration has worked very, very hard on the iranian challenge and the president has said that take my word, we're not interested in containing iran, we're interested in preventing iran from developing nuclear technology. i think it should assuage israelis who are concerned about this issue i wonder why-- and this seems to be part of the conversation in washington-- that israelis need an american president to show some deep emotional attachmen
, and what it means for american foreign policy.me joining me is michael gordon.jo he is chief military correspondent for the "new york times." his new book is called "end game: theis inside story of the struggle for iraq." i am pleased to have him here back a this table. welcome. good to see you. >> glad to be here. >> rose: this is, many are say, the detailed history from t the military point of view of the iraqi war. is that a fair assessment? >> well, it-- i started out to do, that but actually, i did a little more than that in this sense-- i had a coauthor, general trainer -- a >> who you worked with before. >> i started out to do a book on the surge which i had covered before the surge, during the surge, and after the surge, onng the ground inraq, and i concluded you couldn't really evaluate the surge until youal knew what was policy was before the surge and you couldn't evaluate whether the surge worked or didn't until you found out what happened afterwards. it became kind of a political military. and one thing i did try to do which a lot of american authors haven't done, frankl
and deficit thing. another is that i think the republican party has to make clear what its foreign policy is. it has had two wars for the past 12 years, people are still settling in and thinking, the voters have said, we don't like that. we're not for that. the republican party has to make clear what it stands for and it is going to have a little bit of debate to get there. those two big things and the policies that spring from them will make all of the difference, so will an eventual compelling presidential candidate. somebody who is involved right now. at the end of the day, it's the candidates who resolve a lot of unresolved things by taking a stand and speaking forcefully for it. >> that was bill clinton after walter mondale lost it. after jimmy carter lost. we had a dynamic governor who was reformed minded and brought those issues into the national forefront. he really helped recharge the democratic party. you know, the republican party is out to lunch. i watched cpac, karl. karl was a former friend. >> i thought i was a current friend? >> you're always a friend, you owe me some chili.
. and susan glasser, executive editor of "foreign policy" magazine. it seems as john kerry hop scotchs around the region, all he is encountering are rocks and hard places. am i right? >> yes, you are right about that. i mean, this is a region i think that actually has been crying out for a bit more u.s. engagement, but that doesn't mean that it's going to be easy. the secretary kerry clearly shows he's ready to be engaged but, you know, he's walking into a situation in iraq where the united states has already withdrawn its troops in afghanistan where we're in the process, and that means we are diminishing influence in both of those places. we still have interests there but diminishing influence. syria, a very, very hot conflict. the united states has been reluctant to get more involved, and then... and iran, of course, difficult negotiations with, you know, not necessarily any sign of progress. and then on top of all of that, secretary kerry has shown that he wants to take on the israeli-palestinian issue and see if he can make progress where others have not. >> ifill: what does his schedule,
on foreign relations and author of "foreign policy begins at home." richard, thank you for joining me. although it seems to have been a successful trip for relations with israel has it done much to nudge the peace process forward? >> it's in some ways set the foundation or provided a context. i've been a diplomat before and there are times you can do peace plans, times situationes are right for specific proposals. this is not one of them. this was a trip to go over the head of the israeli government, to build a context of support. once that context exists then it makes it less date for the israeli government to dom to a negotiating table and put kids forward. the same logic applies to the palestinian side. this is a pre-negotiating trip. >> do you think he comes back with the stage set where he's prepared to invest his own political capital and get the peace process going? >> i think it's probably too oon to get that decision but great deal and turkey, was brought around with concerns about iran, the fear of syria. now you've had a rejew -- renewed strategic alignment between those tw
on the syria situation and other foreign policy challenges. joining me tonight is the chairman of the house intelligence committee, congressman mike rogers. mr. chairman, thank you for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> bret: let's start in syria. what do we know about the possibility of chemical weapons being used there? >> if you take the whole body of work, from the intelligence reports over the last two years, i believe it's highly probable that chemical weapons were used at least in some small amounts in syria. which is in violation of the chemical weapons convention. >> bret: now, foreign policy magazine, they have this quote. syrian support group, s.s.g., the only american organization licensed by the u.s. government to send money directly to the fsa, which is on the ground in syria, issued a press release yesterday claiming the gas that killed civilians in separate instances, two separate instances near me das cuss was a chemical agent similarlant found -- schismlant found in pesticide. it causes similar effects like muscle, nerve, respiratory death. >> do you believe it's t
that chemical agents have been used. senator lindsey graham spoke about the allegations telling foreign policy that quote this. we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapons sites either in conjunction with our partners or, if nothing else, by ourselves. if the choice is to send in troops to secure the weapons sites versus allowing chemical weapons to get in the hands of some of the most violent people in the world, i vote to cut this off before it becomes a problem. but following intelligence briefings, the chairs of both the house and senate intelligence committee said they believe president bashar al assad has crossed the so-called red line in the civil war. >> i think the days are becoming mow desperate. the regime is more desperate. we know where the chemical weapons are. there's no secret that they are there. i think the probabilities are very high that we are going into some very dark times and i think the white house needs to be prepared. >> i have a high probability to believe that chemical weapons were used. we need that final verification but given everything we know over t
there was a role in america's foreign policy. he wants america to pull back. he pointed to a split within the republican party on national security before almost anybody else did. he really actually outlined some of the divisions. when you look at his policies what he stands for, abolishing the departments of education, commerce, trade, the federal reserve. i think when he gets more out there in the public, when he's not just giving a talk at cpac, i just think that what he says is going to be too extreme for members of the republican party who support still the hawkish line of american involvement in the world and i think for clearly when he gets into i think into middle america, for running for anything like a presidential nomination that would be a very tricky position, some of those domestic issues, too. >> eugene, this is coming at a time that the gop is trying to reconfigure, the autopsy, what do you do to a corpse to bring it back to life? there are specific policy recommendations, raines preeb is's document. one was about gay marriage and one was about immigration. how do you move
'hanlon director of research and a senior of foreign policy fellow at the brookings institution. >> thank you. >> that sound that we played for the president's speech today, is what we heard a fair response to the criticism that the president hasn't acted aggressively enough? >> well it's a very fair way of looking at the theory. in theory any military operation sound appealing when you're frustrated by what you're watching and you want to make a difference. the president is certainly right to remember that when you get involved, you know, it's hard to get out and even if you start providing arms to the rebels, you implicate yourself in a way that it mayes in estate escalation. i agree that we should be arming the rebels and i consider nato arab league and combined air strikes in support of it, but i understand the president's reluctance so far. i think it's about time, though, we re-assess. you've written extensively on military options for syria. is it your view that the united states should enact an air operation? because one of assad's greatest advantages over the rebels, as you know, is
. everybody is interested obviously in the foreign policy side like the end of the war in vietnam. but i noticed this in the second term of the bush administration there was more interest in the domestic policy. it is a real problem for historians because of the tapes richard nixon is not always very happy about his domestic policy. i was wondering since we are looking at the earlier period for next-gen, where would you put him in the new deal in the 1950's? would you say he is interested in a continuation of the new deal? what role does he see the government playing in the society? >> certainly think he had no desire to undo the new deal. she was very much aware and in favor of a catastrophic health plan. don't forget when nixon was growing up his family was poor, but he had two brothers who died of tuberculosis so there wasn't very good health care. one brother was 7-years-old, six or seven and then his older brother died when he was 25 and so she was -- so he was very much an internationalist and nixon was a big supporter of the marshall plan and voted for it and a lot of his sestak e
. >> you had a great number of things. the stories about the economy and stories about foreign policy etc.. what prompted me to write spin masters though is the benghazi attack and the days that followed. it became clear that the political news media rather than focusing on the story of foreign-policy failure and a president who had promised reproach along with the muslim world and was failing to produce it said
, that despite the fact there's always an inconsistency, of late there's development a schism in the foreign policy and mitt romney would indeed lead us down the road to another catastrophic, this time with iran. >> having been there while it was going so wrong, seeing it up close, when you think about our governance, do you think there's something that we can do now as a country to try to make it right, to fix the harm we did to ourselves as a country, not just politically. is there any kind of way we can fix the strategic error of that war internally and internationally? >> i think it boils down to the american people. i would like to say there's institutional change we could make statutorily or otherwise. i would like to say that we could elect different people. i would like to say all manner of things that would be easier to do, but i think the bottom line is the american people have got to get angry and they've got to start doing things, local things, state things, national things, whatever they can find or think to do. i was in great neck, new york, talking to a synagogue group this la
to make it seem like the war in iraq thing was actually a great idea and not the worst foreign policy disaster in maybe a century. there's paul wolfowitz defending it over the weekend, and michael oh han lon. and donald rumsfeld saying ten years ago began the long difficult work of liberating 25 million iraqis, all who played a roll in history deserve our respect and appreciation. the nervous thing is that he has the gall to use the word history and saying it was all about liberating the iraqi people. they're trying to do it. they're using the tenth year anniversary of the war to make you believe it didn't happen the way it happened. to try to make you believe it was all about liberating the iraqi people from the tyrant. they want you to believe what they proposed to the american people ten, will he have enyears ago, go liberate them from a tyrant. the american said we should, and we went and were greeted as lib ray tors, we knew it would take eight and a half years and cost millions and lose many people. they say it was hard but that difficult liberate work is what we signed up for a
. >> in a visit important to our nation's security, the republican attacks against this president's foreign policy seemed puny, especially when the president and prime minister were actually laughing. >> and i want to express a special thanks to sarah as well as your two sons for their warmth and hospitality. it was wonderful to see them. they are -- i did inform the prime minister that they are very good looking young men who clearly got their looks from their mother. >> well, i can say the same of your daughters. >> this is true. our goal is to improve our gene pool by marrying women better than we are. >> this is the reality. the gop consistently tries to paint the president as someone that he isn't. they falsely accuse him of being anti-american, of being lazy, of being born in another court, and then comes the reality. today it was there for the world to see. joining me now is jim warren, washington bureau chief of "the new york daily news" and msnbc contribute are to, joy reid. thank you both for being here tonight. >> thank you. >> jim, iran, syria, the peace process, these are really tough
's good to get away from congress. >> we'll get insight on what comes next from our foreign policy experts, including abc news global affairs correspondent christiane amanpour and jeffrey goldberg. >>> hello again. you're going to see president obama touching down at andrews air force late last night after his first trip to israel as president. we'll analyze the mission and what comes next for that volatile region later in the program. >>> but, first, the debates that president obama is returning to here at home. and for that, a "this week" first, jim messina and karl rove join our powerhouse roundtable. welcome to both of you, along with donna brazile, peggy noonan and "nightline" anchor terry moran. karl, let me begin with you, 5:00 a.m., the senate passes a budget. the house has already passed a budget. very stark differences between the two, everyone waiting for president obama to weigh in on this. i guess my question to you is, despite those stark differences, do you see this as the beginning of negotiations toward a compromise? >> i frankly take this as a constructive sign. it gives
foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, and then florida. and he believes that indiana will beat louisville on n the title game. on the women's side baylor connecticut, and california. his final pick for that will be revealed tomorrow. >> bill: i didn't do the women's bracket. >> i don't the women's bracket. i'm sorry. >> bill: we'll let you know our picks later this hour. >> michelle obama was at the [ inaudible ] to celebrate easter and brought bo with her. she handed out bo-shaped cookies, and handed out tickets to the easter egg roll at the white house. >> bill: that fisher house is a great, great program. really, really do good stuff. >> yeah.
.s. ambassador to israel, now vice president and director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution in washington, d.c. and david makovsky is the director of the project on the middle east peace process at the washington institute for near east policy. welcome to both of you. martin, let me start with you. as the president goes to israel, what will he find in general terms in this new government? what do we know or not know? >> well, it's only a couple of days old. so it's a very hard to tell exactly what it's going to shape up to. what we have is right wing party with a shift within the likud further in the right in terms of its composition. we have a large center party, lapid, this new rising star. then to his left is tzipi livni who was the only candidate to campaign on the two-state solution. he only got 56. >> brown: somehow they all worked together or were supposed to work together. >> there's a special glue on the seats of israeli cabinet chairs which kind of keep them stuck there for a while at least. they have to respond to their constituency. that is the key po
armed services committee. chairman carl levin, democrat of michigan told foreign policy.com's josh rogan he wants to see the u.s. help establish a no-fly zone over syria. lindsey graham republican senator from south carolina called for u.s. boots on the ground. quote we need to come up with a plan to secure these weapon sites either in conjunction with our partners or if nothing else by ourselves. graham told josh rogan. you have got to get on the ground. i don't care what it takes. the white house held firm today saying its policy for now is that it will not be providing any lethal aid to the rebels. shep? >> shepard: james rosen at the white house tonight. well, a mixed day on wall street as investors around the world obviously eyed the island nation of cyprus where lawmakers rejected a controversial plan to qualify for a bailout. the dow made up for early losses and closed up but just four points. the nasdaq fell 8 the s&p off close to four. meantime markets in europe dropped over fears that the government of cyprus would tap into people's savings accounts. just reach in and get money
back in the '90s. he's now the vice president director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution here in washington. he's joining us from new york. martin, i thought this was one of the most important speeches that an american president has ever delivered about the situation between the israelis and the palestinians. but give me your thoughts. >> i agree, wolf. you said it was bold. i would say it was courageous. not just in terms of making the case to the israeli public, that they do have a partner, that peace is possible, but actually urging them to pressure their leaders to move forward. he is famously being quoted before our elections as saying that he considered the leadership in israel as political cowards. he seems to be going over their heads to the israeli young people, trying to give them hope and trying to encourage them to press their leaders to make peace. and that is, i think, a very bold and courageous thing. but i would say one other thing. he, having tried to lower expectations about this visit, has now raised them sky high in terms of the expectation
: joining me martin indyk, director of foreign policy brookings institution, also a former u.s. ambassador to israel. and itamar rabinovich served as israel ambassador to the united states. at the same time he was chief negotiator with the syrian government and president and founder of the israeli institute. i'm pleased to have both of them at this table, at this time, when the president i saying some very interesting things in israel. so welcome. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> rose: characterize this speech by the president. >> this speech was typical obama at his best, working his oratorical magic on a crowd that lapped it up. he spoke very convincingly about his commitment to israel's security and his understanding of their security dilemmas. and particularly underlined what he was going to prevent iran from getting nuclear weaponsment buthen he went into a rif about peace and the necessity of peace and the possibility of peace, and why peace has to be just, even saying put yourself, you israelis put yourself in the shoes of the palestinians. and talked over the heads of the leadership
secretary of state she has the ooutcome of his foreign policy record to date around her neck and consequences of that to deal with all kinds of things could happen. way too early to assure her a clear thing. >> bill: everyone has to acknowledge that her stint of secretary of state perception, not necessarily reality. but perception has been very successful because when two thirds think that she is okay now, that means they like what she did. and that includes some republicans because with it thirds much the country isn't democrat. i see her. i'm trying to look at the democratic field. you have guys like andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. o'malley the governor of maryland. they are going to run to her left. all right? they are going to try to knock her out from the left if i had to bleted right now i would bet she is a democratic nominee. >> that's what we all thought a few years ago. >> bill: there is no barack obama in the country unless an illegal alien is going to run. >> we didn't think there was a barack obama then. >> bill: we knew barack obama was sitting in the s
factor in foreign policy decisions of both democratic and republican administrations for years to come. what do you think? >> i wouldn't necessarily agree, because, you know, in vietnam we said as the colonel said we learned our lesson but we didn't learn a lesson in the iraq war. even now, the same warhawks are saying we should be in syria. we should go and bomb iran. so i feel as if there is a premise we should be more isolated, that's not the temperature of the republican party for the most part, besides rand paul, who is separate. that's a shame. because we as a country should always be the reluctant warrior. when you look back now to the ten-year anniversary of the iraq war to know this war was started as you mentioned, chris, because the bush administration said there was weapons of mass destruction, and because they said there was a connection with 9/11, neither of which were true and our intelligence agency said to the administration this isn't true yet they still moved forward at the cost of over 4400 americans losing their lives. >> almost 4500 american troops killed. at leas
it all up, it's probably $2 trillion to $3 trillion of american costs, distorted american foreign policy. the idea that we took so much of our situation after the end of the cold war and we devoted it to iraq given everything else we could've, should've done. historians will scratch their head and say why did the united states get so distracted and distorted -- >> and stayed there after we knew there weren't weapons. >> and that's the big lesson we should draw from this in afghanistan. we've got to respect local realities. united states cannot go around the middle east and remake it in our liking. we've got to have a degree of humility about the limits of our influence. and you asked whether we learned the lessons. with vietnam, iraq and afghanistan, i hope we've learnlearn ed. >> and iraq and afghanistan. first of all, be far, far more skeptical than most of us were going in to iraq. also, no matter how far you are down the path, if it's the wrong path, turn around. and we should've done that. i want to read what you talked about the human cost. mike barnicle e-mailed me this last night
funding. the same way democrats have often done on some foreign policy issues in the past with a republican president. stop the money is how you stop the law. but i think it's going to be a you have tough thing to do. it's, again, once the program gets in place, it's hard to take it back. and one of these things the governors have done when they let the federal government set up the system is that takes the states out of having any ability to set up the exchange themself. i mean, it gives the state less say and the federal government more say. that's going to be a tough thing for the republicans. you know, republicans want more say in the states. so even in times of posing obamacare, they're actually giving more power to the federal government. it's very complicated issue. of. jon: well, it is complicated, and it's three years old, and most of its provisions really haven't kicked in yet. that's what remains to be seen, how, you know, people adjust to it as they actually have to sign on for this thing. joe trippi -- >> that's right. jon: -- we'll continue to keep a watch on
at this podium and talk about foreign policy issues but i'm glad to be here today to talk about this diplomatic campaign in pakistan and afghanistan. i want to say one of the good things about speaking to a washington audience, when jessica goes through the jobs you've had everyone goes uh-huh, uh-huh. >> i was somewhere speaking and someone said here is ambassador grossman. i want to say what a pleasure it is to see so many people here in the audience who i have had the great benefit of learning from for many years. without drawing any distinctions i hope you'll allow me three. i started my career in pakistan junior to 1979 as a officer and howy was a boss of mine. i see ambassador hugh sane as the first a foreign diplomat i ever had to meet and do business with. i'm glad to see you. simon henderson was a stringer for a number of very important pub bli indications then and he taught me a lot of about journalism. i know there are others this in this room as well. those three take me back to 1979.1978 and we'll see what you say when this is over. what i want to do stod take up the offer that i
. it was a name juror foreign policy objective of the obama administration when he came in. special envoy grossman who took mr. holbrooke's place when he passed away had a principle mission to do that but those negotiations broke down because one, the karzai government was not involved, pakistan was not involved and the various influential groups inside afghanistan were also not involved. the fact that karzai is beginning the initiative i don't see anything wrong with that. i think it's the beginning of a very long process which is also troubled by the opposition that the factions have and the strong views. i mean people in afghanistan do not want the taliban to take control of any of the population inside of afghanistan after a negotiated settlement to be sure. jenna: you mentioned the factions though. it was interesting doing a little research for this segment i realize the state department does not list the taliban as a terrorist organization. there are different taliban-related groups, for example, a taliban, i want to call it a sector, a taliban group in pakistan that is listed as a terrorist
nations, united states is coming up too much with foreign policy and helping the fallen in getting involved too much. -- getting involved with foreign nations too much. u.n. another call on the did you want to weigh in on that? way it ist is not the seen in the world, where people feel the united states is not engaged enough after recent years. host: nathan guttman is with jewish daily forward and said arikat with al-quds. question had a quick and i would like a clarification of it. that the two me state solution is dead. the situation is static. here is my question. understood that all of the palestinians in the west bay and in gaza, are they subject -- in the west bank and in gaza, are they subject to israel? do we have a situation where palestinians do not get rights? guttman? the minority of the palestinians in east jerusalem do have is really i.d. cards. arelegal terms is that they an occupied population. guest: absolutely. the occupation that has gone on for far too long has denied palestinians the most basic of rights. israelis can arrest people, as we have seen last night.
direction, that the appeal of a nonintervention in foreign- policy is really picking up's read. rand paul stop by national review and he is a charismatic figure. that matters in politics. we saw his speech here and elsewhere that this is a guy who resonates on the floor and i think he has a bright future in republican politics. >> did john mccain revised his remark? i did not know that. >> he apologized. >> good for him. he was jealous that someone could stand up for 12 hours without urinating. >> rand paul had help with other folks. i agree with the fact that we ought to be putting pressure on the justice department and the administration to come forward with a lot of clearances. what was your take on it? >> given the situation he's in, many conservatives -- his father could walk into a room and rand is the opposite. rand looks for ways to diffuse the situation. people who have served in politics understand how important that is. i had the privilege of going with rand paul and his wife and two of his sons to israel right outside of jordan in january. what i saw was amazing politician. a
those ones relative to foreign policy end up sometimes driving the most passionate dust up. but look, we have four great senators that you've mentioned there. they all have very differing ideas. they are all part of our caucus and bring a lot to it. i think it's time to move on and focus on those things that unite us. look, i really do think it's healthy that people are being as outspoken as they are right now, and hopefully that will lead to some unification down the road. >> senator corker, always good to have you here in "the situation room." thank you. >> thank you. >>> there are very few places left in new york where you can smoke them, and now mayor michael bloomberg wants to make it so you can't see them. up next, controversy over his plan to force stores to hide cigarettes. i don't make any decisions about who to hire without going to angie's list first. you'll find reviews on home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. with angie's list, i know who to call, and i know the results will be fantastic. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. >>> he's gone after trans f
levin, chairman of the armed services committee, and u.s. defense and foreign policy. later a discussion on expanding coverage under the health care law for the lgbt community. >> president obama is set to arrive in israel on wednesday, followed by a was -- a visit to the west bank and a final stop in jordan, during his first overseas trip in his second term. two former middle east advisers discussed theouse president's trip. from the washington institute, this is 90 minutes. >> good afternoon. and welcome to the washington institute. i am the director of the institute. i'm very happy to welcome all of you today. just at the outside, if i could remind you, cell phone off please. not just on a vibrate. this event is being live streamed for our thousands of fans around the world. the event is being broadcast by c-span. -- say ng you can say can and will be used against you. we are gathered here today because president obama is off for the inaugural overseas visit of his second term. east,going to the middle israel, to the west bank, and to jordan. his itinerary is very different than the i
areas of our government to do that. remember, a lot of what our defense budget is is foreign policy now. it's not defense. it's not war fighting. we're not using our men and women under arms to really protect us. look at our defense budget as a policy against bad guys. we're taking a lot of that insurance money and using it for other things, other things which are not going to help us if these bad guys come after us. >> brian: if the pentagon has their chance to cut, this is the type of stuff they will cut. >> they're not allowed to do that. this administration, with all their transparencies, not going to let us know where the money and how the money is being spent. >> brian: his book is called " shadow boxes." >> why to see you. >> brian: tv anchors are supposed to be ready for anything. but how do you get ready for this? >> we have break news to report. fox 54 has just learned a huntsville news anchor is being proposed on live -- right now. >> brian: wow. meet the anchor who got the surprise of her life on live television. on a serious note, the sequester is putting the usda workers o
of all, they don't like covering foreign policy stories anymore. most of the bureaus have shut down around the world. they rely on stringers. we've got a lot of propaganda coming into the american media, and i think that while the ten-year anniversary is important, it's more important for the media to look into the fact that this isn't just about nation-states or any one leader. this is about a virus, radical islam, that continues to threaten not only the middle east, but much of the rest of the world. that's the real story that needs to continue to be written, in my view. jon: let me read for you part of the piece that appeared this morning, marvin, in "the new york post" which is owned by the parent corporation of this network. they write: jon: is this, in fact, a bit of a repeat of what we accomplished in world war ii? >> no, it is not a repeat, unfortunately. at the end of world war ii, the u.s. made major efforts, put in an enormous amount of money to help japan and germany change politically, change economically, and both nations did that. in iraq what we are seeing is not the
the detention facility at guantanamo consistent with the national security and foreign policy interests of the united states and interest of justice i hereby order. >> barbara star, pentagon correspondent, is at the pentagon and sunny hostin is in new york. barbara, to you first, what more do we know about their protests, and how is it being handled? >> well, there are a couple of things happening here, don. some of them have regularly protested now for years, and the medical protocol if there is a doctor's decision, yes, they are fed through a tube. some of them have joined this hunger on and off again hunger strike recently, we're told, because of protests over searches in their living area for koran, the holy book of islam. military officials tell us only islamic personnel, translators, if you will, actually touch the korans during the searches of their cells, u.s. military personnel do not touch the koran. but this has led to some of the protests and is one of the reasons behind the growing hunger strike. >> sunny, to you now, if a prisoner wants to refuse food, is that not their le
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